Native Florida Landscapes
can help ensure trees
survive nearby construction.

Install a four-foot high
fence or barrier
(minimum) at least at the
dripline
Retain grade level
around any tree
Designate on-site
parking, traffic and
storage away from the
trees.
Relocate trenches or
employ tunneling for
utilities
Take measures to
protect tree root system
from compaction.    
Maintain a buffer of trees
or shrubs around the
specimen for protection.
Tree maintenance
should be conducted
during construction
(watering, fertilizing,
pruning, and pest
control).
Make provision for the
disposal of potentially
harmful items, e.g.,
excess concrete, etc.
away from trees.
Restrict removal of
topsoil around trees.
Excavate trenches by
hand in areas with roots
larger than 1" diameter.
Do not build up soil
around base of tree!
Avoid locating highly
reflective surfaces
nearby.
Native Florida Landscapes, LLC
The biggest challenge of having trees co-exist in a
built environment is the importanceof providing
enough non-compacted soil to accommodate large
root systems.

Trees take up a lot of space above and below the
ground. Their root systems are aerobic,
meaning they require oxygen in the form of air, which
is available to them in the pore space of
non-compacted soils. Typically, 25-50 per cent of
the volume of native soil is air, or pore space. This is
the exact opposite of the density of soil that is
required to support buildings and pavement.
(Construction soils are typically compacted to 90-98
per cent of its capacity in order to support
structures.)
Construction Monitoring
Tree preservation begins before construction, protects the tree
during construction, and cares for the tree after the job is done.
Oak tree preserved during construction
Compaction damage can also be a result of activities that occur after a tree is
planted, such vehicles parking off of pavements on the root zone of trees. Avoiding
compaction starts with the landscape design.  A good design is to have fewer but
larger green spaces than the typical parking lot islands in commercial and urban
designs.

There is some remediation for soils that have been compacted. These methods
include: vertical mulching, soil excavation, or radial trenching. Each compacted
situation should be inspected by a Certified Arborist to determine which method is
appropriate.
Native Florida Landscapes
certified arborist uses an air
knife around a tree's roots to
remedy compacted soil.
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call 386.235.0404